Ukrainian, Russophone, (Other) Russian: Hybrid Identities and Narratives in Post-Soviet Culture and Politics

Book panel (in English) | 14 September 2020

At this online event, Marco Puleri talks about his book Ukrainian, Russophone, (Other) Russian: Hybrid Identities and Narratives in Post-Soviet Culture and Politics, in which he explores the role of Russian/Russophone culture in Ukraine today and asks how the dynamics of Ukrainian culture provide any insights into the development of a global Russian or Russophone culture. The author responds to these questions by investigating the interplay between literature, politics, market and identity in Ukrainian cultural processes (1991-2008). After his talk, Marco Puleri is joined by Roman Dubasevych, Miriam Finkelstein and Nina Frieß for a discussion of the book and the broader research agenda focusing on Russophone literature in Ukraine.

The book talk is the first event in the series Russophone Voices: The Words and Worlds of Russian-language Literature, organised by Nina Frieß (ZOiS), Naomi Caffee (Reed College Portland, Oregon), Miriam Finkelstein (University of Graz) and Marco Puleri (University of Bologna). In no particular order, the series explores Russophone literatures, discusses research strategies and findings and provides a platform for Russophone authors.

2020. Ukrainian, Russophone, (Other) Russian: Hybrid Identities and Narratives in Post-Soviet Culture and Politics, Berlin: Peter Lang.

Read more: Marco Puleri talks about his book in our Meet the Author interview


Marco Puleri is Research Fellow in Post-Soviet Studies and Adjunct Professor of History of Eastern Europe, Nation Building and Protection of Minorities at the University of Bologna. His research interests include contemporary Russian and Ukrainian sociocultural developments and nation-building in the post-Soviet area.

Roman Dubasevych is Junior Professor of Ukrainian Cultural Studies at the University of Greifswald. His current research interests include Ukrainian memory culture, political songs, praise and criticism of rulers, and discourses of violence and gender in the war in Ukraine.

Miriam Finkelstein is an assistant professor working in the literary and cultural studies research area at the Institute of Slavic Studies, University of Graz. Her research topics include contemporary Russian and Russophone poetry, Russian-Jewish literature and translingual literature of the Russian diaspora in Europe and North America.

Nina Frieß is a researcher at the Centre for East European and International Studies (ZOiS). Her current research interests include Russophone literature and culture in Kazakhstan.